Using the telescope of the Lowell observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, Slipher he discovered that dozens of galaxies in fact were being scattered from a central point. Between 1918 and 1922, Sitter, Friedmann and Slipher, independently shared their discoveries with Einstein, but strangely it resisted to his solution – as if, in its mind, account of the theological implications of a universe in explosion had occurred. Inclusively Einstein wrote a letter to Zeitschrift fur Physik, a famous technical magazine, calling to the suggestions of Friedmann " sospechosas" and with respect to those of Sitter, Einstein said: " This situation (of a universe expanding) me irrita". In another note, Einstein tranquilized to one of its colleagues saying: " Still I have not fallen in the hands of sacerdotes" – a clear reference towards Sitter, Friedmann and Slipher. The Discovery of Hubble In 1925, the North American astronomer, Edward Hubble gave to the static model of the universe a very great blow him. Using until that then greatest telescope of the world, Hubble revealed that each galaxy within the 6 xs 1017 miles around the Earth was backing down. Einstein was obstinately refused to recognize the work of Hubble. It continued teaching the static model by other five years until it traveled from Berlin to Pasadena personally to examine the test.

In the conclusion of the trip, Einstein admitted: " The new observations of Hubble make seem that the general structure of the universe is not esttica". Einstein died in 1955, modified a little its position but completely it was not convinced that the universe was expanding. The Sound of Big Bang Ten years later, in 1965, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson were calibrating a sensitive super detector of microwaves in the Bell labs of New Jersey. It did not matter where both scientists aimed, the instrument always sounded with the same type of sound – to regulate, with three degrees Kelvin (3K).

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